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Glossary of Terms
Acronyms are listed prior to definitions.
As provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and several other sources. This database will continue to grow with your contributions.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 


EA— Endangerment Assessment; Enforcement Agreement; Environmental Action; Environmental Assessment;. Environmental Audit
EAF— Electric Arc Furnaces
EAG— Exposure Assessment Group
EAP— Environmental Action Plan
EAR— Environmental Auditing Roundtable
EASI— Environmental Alliance for Senior Involvement
EB— Emissions Balancing
EC— Emulsifiable Concentrate; Environment Canada; Effective Concentration
ECA— Economic Community for Africa
ECAP— Employee Counselling and Assistance Program
ECD— Electron Capture Detector
ECHH— Electro-Catalytic Hyper-Heaters
ECL— Environmental Chemical Laboratory
ECOS— Environmental Council of the States
ECR— Enforcement Case Review
ECRA— Economic Cleanup Responsibility Act
ED— Effective Dose
EDA— Emergency Declaration Area
EDB— Ethylene Dibromide
EDC— Ethylene Dichloride
EDD— Enforcement Decision Document
EDF— Environmental Defense Fund
EDRS— Enforcement Document Retrieval System
EDS— Electronic Data System; Energy Data System
EDTA— Ethylene Diamine Triacetic Acid
EDX— Electronic Data Exchange
EDZ— Emission Density Zoning
EEA— Energy and Environmental Analysis
EECs— Estimated Environmental Concentrations
EER— Excess Emission Report
EERL— Eastern Environmental Radiation Laboratory
EERU— Environmental Emergency Response Unit
EESI— Environment and Energy Study Institute
EESL— Environmental Ecological and Support Laboratory
EETFC— Environmental Effects, Transport, and Fate Committee
EF— Emission Factor
EFO— Equivalent Field Office
EFTC— European Fluorocarbon Technical Committee
EGR— Exhaust Gas Recirculation
EH— Redox Potential
EHC— Environmental Health Committee
EHS— Extremely Hazardous Substance
EI— Emissions Inventory
EIA— Environmental Impact Assessment. Economic Impact Assessment
EIL— Environmental Impairment Liability
EIR— Endangerment Information Report; Environmental Impact Report
EIS— Environmental Impact Statement; Environmental Inventory System
EIS/AS— Emissions Inventory System/Area Source
EIS/PS— Emissions Inventory System/Point Source
EKMA— Empirical Kinetic Modeling Approach
EL— Exposure Level
ELI— Environmental Law Institute
ELR— Environmental Law Reporter
EM— Electromagnetic Conductivity
EMAP— Environmental Mapping and Assessment Program
EMAS— Enforcement Management and Accountability System
EMR— Environmental Management Report
EMS— Enforcement Management System
EMSL— Environmental Monitoring Support Systems Laboratory
EMTS— Environmental Monitoring Testing Site; Exposure Monitoring Test Site
EnPA— Environmental Performance Agreement
EO— Ethylene Oxide
EOC— Emergency Operating Center
EOF— Emergency Operations Facility (RTP)
EOP— End Of Pipe
EOT— Emergency Operations Team
EP— Earth Protectors; Environmental Profile; End-use Product; Experimental Product; Extraction Procedure
EPAA— Environmental Programs Assistance Act
EPAAR— EPA Acquisition Regulations
EPCA— Energy Policy and Conservation Act
EPACT— Environmental Policy Act
EPACASR— EPA Chemical Activities Status Report
EPCRA— Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act
EPD— Emergency Planning District
EPI— Environmental Policy Institute
EPIC— Environmental Photographic Interpretation Center
EPNL— Effective Perceived Noise Level
EPRI— Electric Power Research Institute
EPTC— Extraction Procedure Toxicity Characteristic
EQIP— Environmental Quality Incentives Program
ER— Ecosystem Restoration; Electrical Resistivity
ERA— Economic Regulatory Agency
ERAMS— Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System
ERC— Emergency Response Commission. Emissions Reduction Credit, Environmental Research Center
ERCS— Emergency Response Cleanup Services
ERDA— Energy Research and Development Administration
ERD&DAA— Environmental Research, Development and Demonstration Authorization Act
ERL— Environmental Research Laboratory
ERNS— Emergency Response Notification System
ERP— Enforcement Response Policy
ERT— Emergency Response Team
ERTAQ— ERT Air Quality Model
ES— Enforcement Strategy
ESA— Endangered Species Act. Environmentally Sensitive Area
ESC— Endangered Species Committee
ESCA— Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis
ESCAP— Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific
ESECA— Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act
ESH— Environmental Safety and Health
ESP— Electrostatic Precipitators
ET— Emissions Trading
ETI— Environmental Technology Initiative
ETP— Emissions Trading Policy
ETS— Emissions Tracking System; Environmental Tobacco Smoke
ETV— Environmental Technology Verification Program
EUP— End-Use Product; Experimental Use Permit
EWCC— Environmental Workforce Coordinating Committee
EXAMS— Exposure Analysis Modeling System
ExEx— Expected Exceedance

Ecological Entity— In ecological risk assessment, a general term referring to a species, a group of species, an ecosystem function or characteristic, or a specific habitat or biome.

Ecological/Environmental Sustainability— Maintenance of ecosystem components and functions for future generations.

Ecological Exposure— Exposure of a non-human organism to a stressor.

Ecological Impact— The effect that a man-caused or natural activity has on living organisms and their non-living (abiotic) environment.

Ecological Indicator— A characteristic of an ecosystem that is related to, or derived from, a measure of biotic or abiotic variable, that can provide quantitative information on ecological structure and function. An indicator can contribute to a measure of integrity and sustainability.

Ecological Integrity— A living system exhibits integrity if, when subjected to disturbance, it sustains and organizes self-correcting ability to recover toward a biomass end-state that is normal for that system. End-states other than the pristine or naturally whole may be accepted as normal and good.

Ecological Risk Assessment— The application of a formal framework, analytical process, or model to estimate the effects of human actions(s) on a natural resource and to interpret the significance of those effects in light of the uncertainties identified in each component of the assessment process. Such analysis includes initial hazard identification, exposure and dose-response assessments, and risk characterization.

Ecology— The relationship of living things to one another and their environment, or the study of such relationships.

Economic Poisons— Chemicals used to control pests and to defoliate cash crops such as cotton.

Ecosphere— The “bio-bubble” that contains life on earth, in surface waters, and in the air.

Ecosystem— The interacting system of a biological community and its non-living environmental surroundings.

Ecosystem Structure— Attributes related to the instantaneous physical state of an ecosystem; examples include species population density, species richness or evenness, and standing crop biomass.

Ecotone— A habitat created by the juxtaposition of distinctly different habitats; an edge habitat; or an ecological zone or boundary where two or more ecosystems meet.

Effluent— Wastewater—treated or untreated—that flows out of a treatment plant, sewer, or industrial outfall. Generally refers to wastes discharged into surface waters.

Effluent Guidelines— Technical EPA documents which set effluent limitations for given industries and pollutants.

Effluent Limitation— Restrictions established by a state or EPA on quantities, rates, and concentrations in wastewater discharges.

Ejector— A device used to disperse a chemical solution into water being treated.

Electrodialysis— A process that uses electrical current applied to permeable membranes to remove minerals from water. Often used to desalinize salty or brackish water.

Electromagnetic Geophysical Methods— Ways to measure subsurface conductivity via low-frequency electromagnetic induction.

Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP)— A device that removes particles from a gas stream (smoke) after combustion occurs. The ESP imparts an electrical charge to the particles, causing them to adhere to metal plates inside the precipitator. Rapping on the plates causes the particles to fall into a hopper for disposal.

Eligible Costs— The construction costs for wastewater treatment works upon which EPA grants are based.

EMAP Data— Environmental monitoring data collected under the auspices of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. All EMAP data share the common attribute of being of known quality, having been collected in the context of explicit data quality objectives (DQOs) and a consistent quality assurance program.

Emergency (Chemical)— A situation created by an accidental release or spill of hazardous chemicals that poses a threat to the safety of workers, residents, the environment, or property.

Emergency Exemption— Provision in FIFRA under which EPA can grant temporary exemption to a state or another federal agency to allow the use of a pesticide product not registered for that particular use. Such actions involve unanticipated and/or severe pest problems where there is not time or interest by a manufacturer to register the product for that use. (Registrants cannot apply for such exemptions.)

Emergency Removal Action— 1. Steps take to remove contaminated materials that pose imminent threats to local residents (e.g. removal of leaking drums or the excavation of explosive waste.) 2. The state record of such removals.

Emergency Response Values— Concentrations of chemicals, published by various groups, defining acceptable levels for short-term exposures in emergencies.

Emergency Suspension— Suspension of a pesticide product registration due to an imminent hazard. The action immediately halts distribution, sale, and sometimes actual use of the pesticide involved.

Emission— Pollution discharged into the atmosphere from smokestacks, other vents, and surface areas of commercial or industrial facilities; from residential chimneys; and from motor vehicle, locomotive, or aircraft exhausts.

Emission Cap— A limit designed to prevent projected growth in emissions from existing and future stationary sources from eroding any mandated reductions. Generally, such provisions require that any emission growth from facilities under the restrictions be offset by equivalent reductions at other facilities under the same cap.

Emission Factor— The relationship between the amount of pollution produced and the amount of raw material processed. For example, an emission factor for a blast furnace making iron would be the number of pounds of particulates per ton of raw materials.

Emission Inventory— A listing, by source, of the amount of air pollutants discharged into the atmosphere of a community; used to establish emission standards.

Emission Standard— The maximum amount of air polluting discharge legally allowed from a single source, mobile or stationary.

Emissions Trading— The creation of surplus emission reductions at certain stacks, vents or similar emissions sources and the use of this surplus to meet or redefine pollution requirements applicable to other emissions sources. This allows one source to increase emissions when another source reduces them, maintaining an overall constant emission level. Facilities that reduce emissions substantially may “bank” their “credits” or sell them to other facilities or industries.

Emulsifier— A chemical that aids in suspending one liquid in another. Usually an organic chemical in an aqueous solution.

Encapsulation— The treatment of asbestos-containing material with a liquid that covers the surface with a protective coating or embeds fibers in an adhesive matrix to prevent their release into the air.

Enclosure— Putting an airtight, impermeable, permanent barrier around asbestos-containing materials to prevent the release of asbestos fibers into the air.

End User— Consumer of products for the purpose of recycling. Excludes products for re-use or combustion for energy recovery.

End-of-the-pipe— Technologies such as scrubbers on smokestacks and catalytic convertors on automobile tailpipes that reduce emissions of pollutants after they have formed.

End-use Product— A pesticide formulation for field or other end use. The label has instructions for use or application to control pests or regulate plant growth. The term excludes products used to formulate other pesticide products.

Endangered Species— Animals, birds, fish, plants, or other living organisms threatened with extinction by anthropogenic (man-caused) or other natural changes in their environment. Requirements for declaring a species endangered are contained in the Endangered Species Act.

Endangerment Assessment— A study to determine the nature and extent of contamination at a site on the National Priorities List and the risks posed to public health or the environment. EPA or the state conducts the study when a legal action is to be taken to direct potentially responsible parties to clean up a site or pay for it. An endangerment assessment supplements a remedial investigation.

Endrin— A pesticide toxic to freshwater and marine aquatic life that produces adverse health effects in domestic water supplies.

Energy Management System— A control system capable of monitoring environmental and system loads and adjusting HVAC operations accordingly in order to conserve energy while maintaining comfort.

Energy Recovery— Obtaining energy from waste through a variety of processes (e.g. combustion).

Enforceable Requirements— Conditions or limitations in permits issued under the Clean Water Act Section 402 or 404 that, if violated, could result in the issuance of a compliance order or initiation of a civil or criminal action under federal or applicable state laws. If a permit has not been issued, the term includes any requirement which, in the Regional Administrator’s judgement, would be included in the permit when issued. Where no permit applies, the term includes any requirement which the RA determines is necessary for the best practical waste treatment technology to meet applicable criteria.

Enforcement— EPA, state, or local legal actions to obtain compliance with environmental laws, rules, regulations, or agreements and/or obtain penalties or criminal sanctions for violations. Enforcement procedures may vary, depending on the requirements of different environmental laws and related implementing regulations. Under CERCLA, for example, EPA will seek to require potentially responsible parties to clean up a Superfund site, or pay for the cleanup, whereas under the Clean Air Act the Agency may invoke sanctions against cities failing to meet ambient air quality standards that could prevent certain types of construction or federal funding. In other situations, if investigations by EPA and state agencies uncover willful violations, criminal trials and penalties are sought.

Enforcement Decision Document (EDD)— A document that provides an explanation to the public of EPA’s selection of the cleanup alternative at enforcement sites on the National Priorities List. Similar to a Record of Decision.

Engineered Controls— Method of managing environmental and health risks by placing a barrier between the contamination and the rest of the site, thus limiting exposure pathways.

Enhanced Inspection and Maintenance (I&M)— An improved automobile inspection and maintenance program—aimed at reducing automobile emissions---that contains, at a minimum, more vehicle types and model years, tighter inspection, and better management practices. It may also include annual computerized or centralized inspections, under-the-hood inspection—for signs of tampering with pollution control equipment—and increased repair waiver cost.

Enrichment— The addition of nutrients (e.g. nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon compounds) from sewage effluent or agricultural runoff to surface water, greatly increases the growth potential for algae and other aquatic plants.

Entrain— To trap bubbles in water either mechanically through turbulence or chemically through a reaction.

Environment— The sum of all external conditions affecting the life, development and survival of an organism.

Environmental Assessment— An environmental analysis prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act to determine whether a federal action would significantly affect the environment and thus require a more detailed environmental impact statement.

Environmental Audit— An independent assessment of the current status of a party’s compliance with applicable environmental requirements or of a party’s environmental compliance policies, practices, and controls.

Environmental/Ecological Risk— The potential for adverse effects on living organisms associated with pollution of the environment by effluents, emissions, wastes, or accidental chemical releases; energy use; or the depletion of natural resources.

Environmental Equity/Justice— Equal protection from environmental hazards for individuals, groups, or communities regardless of race, ethnicity, or economic status. This applies to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies, and implies that no population of people should be forced to shoulder a disproportionate share of negative environmental impacts of pollution or environmental hazard due to a lack of political or economic strength levels.

Environmental Exposure— Human exposure to pollutants originating from facility emissions. Threshold levels are not necessarily surpassed, but low-level chronic pollutant exposure is one of the most common forms of environmental exposure.

Environmental Fate— The destiny of a chemical or biological pollutant after release into the environment.

Environmental Fate Data— Data that characterize a pesticide’s fate in the ecosystem, considering factors that foster its degradation (light, water, microbes), pathways and resultant products.

Environmental Impact Statement— A document required of federal agencies by the National Environmental Policy Act for major projects or legislative proposals significantly affecting the environment. A tool for decision making, it describes the positive and negative effects of the undertaking and cites alternative actions.

Environmental Indicator— A measurement, statistic or value that provides a proximate gauge or evidence of the effects of environmental management programs or of the state or condition of the environment.

Environmental Lien— A charge, security, or encumbrance on a property’s title to secure payment of cost or debt arising from response actions, cleanup, or other remediation of hazardous substances or petroleum products.

Environmental Medium— A major environmental category that surrounds or contacts humans, animals, plants, and other organisms (e.g. surface water, ground water, soil or air) and through which chemicals or pollutants move.

Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking— Joint EPA, NOAA, and USGS program to provide timely and effective communication of environmental data and information through improved and updated technology solutions that support timely environmental monitoring reporting, interpreting, and use of the information for the benefit of the public.

Environmental Response Team— EPA experts located in Edison, N.J., and Cincinnati, OH, who can provide around-the-clock technical assistance to EPA regional offices and states during all types of hazardous waste site emergencies and spills of hazardous substances.

Environmental Site Assessment— The process of determining whether contamination is present on a parcel of real property.

Environmental Sustainability— Long-term maintenance of ecosystem components and functions for future generations.

Environmental Tobacco Smoke— Mixture of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar and smoke exhaled by the smoker.

Epidemiology— Study of the distribution of disease, or other health-related states and events in human populations, as related to age, sex, occupation, ethnicity, and economic status in order to identify and alleviate health problems and promote better health.

Epilimnion— Upper waters of a thermally stratified lake subject to wind action.

Episode (Pollution)— An air pollution incident in a given area caused by a concentration of atmospheric pollutants under meteorological conditions that may result in a significant increase in illnesses or deaths. May also describe water pollution events or hazardous material spills.

Equilibrium— In relation to radiation, the state at which the radioactivity of consecutive elements within a radioactive series is neither increasing nor decreasing.

Equivalent Method— Any method of sampling and analyzing for air pollution which has been demonstrated to the EPA Administrator’s satisfaction to be, under specific conditions, an acceptable alternative to normally used reference methods.

Erosion— The wearing away of land surface by wind or water, intensified by land-clearing practices related to farming, residential or industrial development, road building, or logging.

Established Treatment Technologies— Technologies for which cost and performance data are readily available.

Estimated Environmental Concentration— The estimated pesticide concentration in an ecosystem.

Estuary— Region of interaction between rivers and near-shore ocean waters, where tidal action and river flow mix fresh and salt water. Such areas include bays, mouths of rivers, salt marshes, and lagoons. These brackish water ecosystems shelter and feed marine life, birds, and wildlife.

Ethanol— An alternative automotive fuel derived from grain and corn; usually blended with gasoline to form gasohol.

Ethylene Dibromide (EDB)— A chemical used as an agricultural fumigant and in certain industrial processes. Extremely toxic and found to be a carcinogen in laboratory animals, EDB has been banned for most agricultural uses in the United States.

Eutrophic Lakes— Shallow, murky bodies of water with concentrations of plant nutrients causing excessive production of algae.

Eutrophication— The slow aging process during which a lake, estuary, or bay evolves into a bog or marsh and eventually disappears. During the later stages of eutrophication the water body is choked by abundant plant life due to higher levels of nutritive compounds such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Human activities can accelerate the process.

Evaporation Ponds— Areas where sewage sludge is dumped and dried.

Evapotranspiration— The loss of water from the soil both by evaporation and by transpiration from the plants growing in the soil.

Exceedance— Violation of the pollutant levels permitted by environmental protection standards.

Exclusion— In the asbestos program, one of several situations that permit a Local Education Agency (LEA) to delete one or more of the items required by the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA); e.g. records of previous asbestos sample collection and analysis may be used by the accredited inspector in lieu of AHERA bulk sampling.

Exclusionary Ordinance— Zoning that excludes classes of persons or businesses from a particular neighborhood or area.

Exempt Solvent— Specific organic compounds not subject to requirements of regulation because they are deemed by EPA to be of negligible photochemical reactivity.

Exempted Aquifer— Underground bodies of water defined in the Underground Injection Control program as aquifers that are potential sources of drinking water though not being used as such, and thus exempted from regulations barring underground injection activities.

Exemption— A state (with primacy) may exempt a public water system from a requirement involving a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), treatment technique, or both, if the system cannot comply due to compelling economic or other factors, or because the system was in operation before the requirement or MCL was instituted; and the exemption will not create a public health risk.

Exotic Species— A species that is not indigenous to a region.

Experimental Use Permit— Obtained by manufacturers for testing new pesticides or uses thereof whenever they conduct experimental field studies to support registration on 10 acres or more of land or one acre or more of water.

Experimental Use Permit— A permit granted by EPA that allows a producer to conduct tests of a new pesticide, product and/or use outside the laboratory. The testing is usually done on ten or more acres of land or water surface.

Explosive Limits— The amounts of vapor in the air that form explosive mixtures; limits are expressed as lower and upper limits and give the range of vapor concentrations in air that will explode if an ignition source is present.

Exports — In solid waste program, municipal solid waste and recyclables transported outside the state or locality where they originated.

Exposure— The amount of radiation or pollutant present in a given environment that represents a potential health threat to living organisms.

Exposure Assessment— Identifying the pathways by which toxicants may reach individuals, estimating how much of a chemical an individual is likely to be exposed to, and estimating the number likely to be exposed.

Exposure Concentration— The concentration of a chemical or other pollutant representing a health threat in a given environment.

Exposure Indicator— A characteristic of the environment measured to provide evidence of the occurrence or magnitude of a response indicator’s exposure to a chemical or biological stress.

Exposure Level— The amount (concentration) of a chemical at the absorptive surfaces of an organism.

Exposure Pathway— The path from sources of pollutants via, soil, water, or food to man and other species or settings.

Exposure Route— The way a chemical or pollutant enters an organism after contact; i.e. by ingestion, inhalation, or dermal absorption.

Exposure-Response Relationship— The relationship between exposure level and the incidence of adverse effects.

Extraction Procedure (EP Toxic)— Determining toxicity by a procedure which simulates leaching; if a certain concentration of a toxic substance can be leached from a waste, that waste is considered hazardous, i.e.”EP Toxic.”

Extraction Well— A discharge well used to remove groundwater or air.

Extremely Hazardous Substances— Any of 406 chemicals identified by EPA as toxic, and listed under SARA Title III. The list is subject to periodic revision.