These links are provided for informational purposes only. If you are an educational facility, government office or other non-commercial entity and would like a link on this informational section of American Recycler, please e-mail mary@americanrecycler.com. We are always seeking new sources of recycling education.


Glossary of Terms
Acronyms are listed prior to definitions.
As provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and several other sources. This database will continue to grow with your contributions.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 


CA— Citizen Act. Competition Advocate. Cooperative Agreements. Corrective Action
CAA— Clean Air Act; Compliance Assurance Agreement
CAAA— Clean Air Act Amendments
CAER— Community Awareness and Emergency Response
CAFE— Corporate Average Fuel Economy
CAFO— Concentrated Animal Feedlot; Consent Agreement/Final Order
CAG— Carcinogenic Assessment Group
CAIR— Comprehensive Assessment of Information Rule
CALINE— California Line Source Model
CAM— Compliance Assurance Monitoring rule; Compliance Assurance Monitoring
CAMP— Continuous Air Monitoring Program
CAN— Common Account Number
CAO— Corrective Action Order
CAP— Corrective Action Plan. Cost Allocation Procedure. Criteria Air Pollutant
CAPMoN— Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network
CAR— Corrective Action Report
CAS— Center for Automotive Safety; Chemical Abstract Service
CASAC— Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee
CASLP— Conference on Alternative State and Local Practices
CASTNet— Clean Air Status and Trends Network
CATS— Corrective Action Tracking System
CAU— Carbon Adsorption Unit; Command Arithmetic Unit
CB— Continuous Bubbler
CBA— Chesapeake Bay Agreement. Cost Benefit Analysis
CBD— Central Business District
CBEP— Community Based Environmental Project
CBI— Compliance Biomonitoring Inspection; Confidential Business Information
CBOD— Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand
CBP— Chesapeake Bay Program; County Business Patterns
CCA— Competition in Contracting Act
CCAA— Canadian Clean Air Act
CCAP— Center for Clean Air Policy; Climate Change Action Plan
CCEA— Conventional Combustion Environmental Assessment
CCHW— Citizens Clearinghouse for Hazardous Wastes
CCID— Confidential Chemicals Identification System
CCMS/NATO— Committee on Challenges of a Modern Society/North Atlantic Treaty Organization
CCP— Composite Correction Plan
CC/RTS—Chemical Collection/ Request Tracking System
CCTP— Clean Coal Technology Program
CD— Climatological Data
CDB— Consolidated Data Base
CDBA— Central Data Base Administrator
CDBG— Community Development Block Grant
CDD— Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin
CDF— Chlorinated dibenzofuran
CDHS— Comprehensive Data Handling System
CDI— Case Development Inspection
CDM— Climatological Dispersion Model; Comprehensive Data Management
CDMQC— Climatological Dispersion Model with Calibration and Source Contribution
CDNS— Climatological Data National Summary
CDP— Census Designated Places
CDS— Compliance Data System
CE— Categorical Exclusion. Conditionally Exempt Generator
CEA— Cooperative Enforcement Agreement; Cost and Economic Assessment
CEAT— Contractor Evidence Audit Team
CEARC— Canadian Environmental Assessment Research Council
CEB— Chemical Element Balance
CEC— Commission for Environmental Cooperation
CECATS— CSB Existing Chemicals Assessment Tracking System
CEE— Center for Environmental Education
CEEM— Center for Energy and Environmental Management
CEI— Compliance Evaluation Inspection
CELRF— Canadian Environmental Law Research Foundation
CEM— Continuous Emission Monitoring
CEMS— Continuous Emission Monitoring System
CEPA— Canadian Environmental Protection Act
CEPP— Chemical Emergency Preparedness Plan
CEQ— Council on Environmental Quality
CERCLA— Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (1980)
CERCLIS— Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System
CERT— Certificate of Eligibility
CESQG— Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator
CEST— Community Environmental Service Teams
CF— Conservation Foundation
CFC— Chlorofluorocarbons
CFM— Chlorofluoromethanes
CFR— Code of Federal Regulations
CHABA— Committee on Hearing and Bio-Acoustics
CHAMP— Community Health Air Monitoring Program
CHEMNET— Chemical Industry Emergency Mutual Aid Network
CHESS— Community Health and Environmental Surveillance System
CHIP— Chemical Hazard Information Profiles
CI— Compression Ignition. Confidence Interval
CIAQ— Council on Indoor Air Quality
CIBL— Convective Internal Boundary Layer
CICA— Competition in Contracting Act
CICIS— Chemicals in Commerce Information System
CIDRS— Cascade Impactor Data Reduction System
CIMI— Committee on Integrity and Management Improvement
CIS— Chemical Information System. Contracts Information System
CKD— Cement Kiln Dust
CKRC— Cement Kiln Recycling Coalition
CLC— Capacity Limiting Constituents
CLEANS— Clinical Laboratory for Evaluation and Assessment of Toxic Substances
CLEVER— Clinical Laboratory for Evaluation and Validation of Epidemiologic Research
CLF— Conservation Law Foundation
CLI— Consumer Labelling Initiative
CLIPS— Chemical List Index and Processing System
CLP— Contract Laboratory Program
CM— Corrective Measure
CMA— Chemical Manufacturers Association
CMB— Chemical Mass Balance
CME— Comprehensive Monitoring Evaluation
CMEL— Comprehensive Monitoring Evaluation Log
CMEP— Critical Mass Energy Project
CNG—Compressedd Natural Gas
COCO— Contractor-Owned/ Contractor-Operated
COD— Chemical Oxygen Demand
COH— Coefficient Of Haze
CPDA— Chemical Producers and Distributor Association
CPF— Carcinogenic Potency Factor
CPO— Certified Project Officer
CQA— Construction Quality Assurance
CR— Continuous Radon Monitoring
CROP— Consolidated Rules of Practice
CRP— Child-Resistant Packaging; Conservation Reserve Program
CRR— Center for Renewable Resources
CRSTER— Single Source Dispersion Model
CSCT— Committee for Site Characterization
CSGWPP— Comprehensive State Ground Water Protection Program
CSI— Common Sense Initiative; Compliance Sampling Inspection
CSIN— Chemical Substances Information Network
CSMA— Chemical Specialties Manufacturers Association
CSO— Combined Sewer Overflow
CSPA— Council of State Planning Agencies
CSRL— Center for the Study of Responsive Law
CTARC— Chemical Testing and Assessment Research Commission
CTG— Control Techniques Guidelines
CTSA— Cleaner TechnologiesSubstitutess Assessment
CV— Chemical Vocabulary
CVS— Constant Volume Sampler
CW— Continuous working-level monitoring
CWA— Clean Water Act (aka FWPCA)
CWAP— Clean Water Action Project
CWTC— Chemical Waste Transportation Council
CZMA— Coastal Zone Management Act
CZARA— Coastal Zone Management Act Reauthorization Amendments

Cadmium (Cd)— A heavy metal that accumulates in the environment.

Cancellation— Refers to Section 6 (b) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) which authorizes cancellation of a pesticide registration if unreasonable adverse effects to the environment and public health develop when a product is used according to widespread and commonly recognized practice, or if its labeling or other material required to be submitted does not comply with FIFRA provisions.

Cap— A layer of clay, or other impermeable material installed over the top of a closed landfill to prevent entry of rainwater and minimize leachate.

Capacity Assurance Plan— A statewide plan which supports a state’s ability to manage the hazardous waste generated within its boundaries over a twenty year period.

Capillary Action— Movement of water through very small spaces due to molecular forces called capillary forces.

Capillary Fringe— The porous material just above the water table which may hold water by capillarity (a property of surface tension that draws water upwards) in the smaller void spaces.

Capillary Fringe— The zone above he water table within which the porous medium is saturated by water under less than atmospheric pressure.

Capture Efficiency— The fraction of organic vapors generated by a process that are directed to an abatement or recovery device.

Carbon Absorber— An add-on control device that uses activated carbon to absorb volatile organic compounds from a gas stream. (The VOCs are later recovered from the carbon.)

Carbon Adsorption— A treatment system that removes contaminants from ground water or surface water by forcing it through tanks containing activated carbon treated to attract the contaminants.

Carbon Monoxide (CO)— A colorless, odorless, poisonous gas produced by incomplete fossil fuel combustion.

Carbon Tetrachloride (CC14)— Compound consisting of one carbon atom ad four chlorine atoms, once widely used as a industrial raw material, as a solvent, and in the production of CFCs. Use as a solvent ended when it was discovered to be carcinogenic.

Carboxyhemoglobin— Hemoglobin in which the iron is bound to carbon monoxide(CO) instead of oxygen.

Carcinogen— Any substance that can cause or aggravate cancer.

Carrier— 1.The inert liquid or solid material in a pesticide product that serves as a delivery vehicle for the active ingredient. Carriers do not have toxic properties of their own. 2. Any material or system that can facilitate the movement of a pollutant into the body or cells.

Carrying Capacity— 1. In recreation management, the amount of use a recreation area can sustain without loss of quality. 2. In wildlife management, the maximum number of animals an area can support during a given period.

CAS Registration Number— A number assigned by the Chemical Abstract Service to identify a chemical.

Case Study— A brief fact sheet providing risk, cost, and performance information on alternative methods and other pollution prevention ideas, compliance initiatives, voluntary efforts, etc.

Cask— A thick-walled container (usually lead) used to transport radioactive material. Also called a coffin.

Catalyst— A substance that changes the speed or yield of a chemical reaction without being consumed or chemically changed by the chemical reaction.

Catalytic Converter— An air pollution abatement device that removes pollutants from motor vehicle exhaust, either by oxidizing them into carbon dioxide and water or reducing them to nitrogen.

Catalytic Incinerator— A control device that oxidizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by using a catalyst to promote the combustion process. Catalytic incinerators require lower temperatures than conventional thermal incinerators, thus saving fuel and other costs.

Categorical Exclusion— A class of actions which either individually or cumulatively would not have a significant effect on the human environment and therefore would not require preparation of an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Categorical Pretreatment Standard— A technology-based effluent limitation for an industrial facility discharging into a municipal sewer system. Analogous in stringency to Best Availability Technology (BAT) for direct dischargers.

Cathodic Protection— A technique to prevent corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell.

Cavitation— The formation and collapse of gas pockets or bubbles on the blade of an impeller or the gate of a valve; collapse of these pockets or bubbles drives water with such force that it can cause pitting of the gate or valve surface.

Cells— 1. In solid waste disposal, holes where waste is dumped, compacted, and covered with layers of dirt on a daily basis. 2. The smallest structural part of living matter capable of functioning as an independent unit.

Cementitious— Densely packed and nonfibrous friable materials.

Central Collection Point— Location were a generator of regulated medical waste consolidates wastes originally generated at various locations in his facility. The wastes are gathered together for treatment on-site or for transportation elsewhere for treatment and/or disposal. This term could also apply to community hazardous waste collections, industrial and other waste management systems.

Centrifugal Collector— A mechanical system using centrifugal force to remove aerosols from a gas stream or to remove water from sludge.

Channelization— Straightening and deepening streams so water will move faster, a marsh-drainage tactic that can interfere with waste assimilation capacity, disturb fish and wildlife habitats, and aggravate flooding.

Characteristic— Any one of the four categories used in defining hazardous waste— ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity.

Characterization of Ecological Effects— Part of ecological risk assessment that evaluates ability of a stressor to cause adverse effects under given circumstances.

Characterization of Exposure— Portion of an ecological risk assessment that evaluates interaction of a stressor with one or more ecological entities.

Check-Valve Tubing Pump— Water sampling tool also referred to as a water Pump.

Chemical Case— For purposes of review and regulation, the grouping of chemically similar pesticide active ingredients (e.g. salts and esters of the same chemical) into chemical cases.

Chemical Compound— A distinct and pure substance formed by the union or two or more elements in definite proportion by weight.

Chemical Element— A fundamental substance comprising one kind of atom; the simplest form of matter.

Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD)— A measure of the oxygen required to oxidize all compounds, both organic and inorganic, in water.

Chemical Stressors— Chemicals released to the environment through industrial waste, auto emissions, pesticides, and other human activity that can cause illnesses and even death in plants and animals.

Chemical Treatment— Any one of a variety of technologies that use chemicals or a variety of chemical processes to treat waste.

Chemnet— Mutual aid network of chemical shippers and contractors that assigns a contracted emergency response company to provide technical support if a representative of the firm whose chemicals are involved in an incident is not readily available.

Chemosterilant— A chemical that controls pests by preventing reproduction.

Chemtrec— The industry-sponsored Chemical Transportation Emergency Center; provides information and/or emergency assistance to emergency responders.

Child Resistant Packaging (CRP)— Packaging that protects children or adults from injury or illness resulting from accidental contact with or ingestion of residential pesticides that meet or exceed specific toxicity levels. Required by FIFRA regulations. Term is also used for protective packaging of medicines.

Chiller— A device that generates a cold liquid that is circulated through an air-handling unit’s cooling coil to cool the air supplied to the building.

Chilling Effect— The lowering of the Earth’s temperature because of increased particles in the air blocking the sun’s rays.

Chisel Plowing— Preparing croplands by using a special implement that avoids complete inversion of the soil as in conventional plowing. Chisel plowing can leave a protective cover or crops residues on the soil surface to help prevent erosion and improve filtration.

Chlorinated Hydrocarbons— 1. Chemicals containing only chlorine, carbon, and hydrogen. These include a class of persistent, broad-spectrum insecticides that linger in the environment and accumulate in the food chain. Among them are DDT, aldrin, dieldrin, heptachlor, chlordane, lindane, endrin, Mirex, hexachloride, and toxaphene. Other examples include TCE, used as an industrial solvent. 2. Any chlorinated organic compounds including chlorinated solvents such as dichloromethane, trichloromethylene, chloroform.

Chlorinated Solvent— An organic solvent containing chlorine atoms(e.g. methylene chloride and 1,1,1-trichloromethane). Uses of chlorinated solvents are include aerosol spray containers, in highway paint, and dry cleaning fluids.

Chlorination— The application of chlorine to drinking water, sewage, or industrial waste to disinfect or to oxidize undesirable compounds.

Chlorinator— A device that adds chlorine, in gas or liquid form, to water or sewage to kill infectious bacteria.

Chlorine-Contact Chamber— That part of a water treatment plant where effluent is disinfected by chlorine.

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)— A family of inert, nontoxic, and easily liquefied chemicals used in refrigeration, air conditioning, packaging, insulation, or as solvents and aerosol propellants. Because CFCs are not destroyed in the lower atmosphere they drift into the upper atmosphere where their chlorine components destroy ozone.

Chlorophenoxy— A class of herbicides that may be found in domestic water supplies and cause adverse health effects.

Chlorosis— Discoloration of normally green plant parts caused by disease, lack of nutrients, or various air pollutants.

Cholinesterase— An enzyme found in animals that regulates nerve impulses by the inhibition of acetylcholine. Cholinesterase inhibition is associated with a variety of acute symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, stomach cramps, and rapid heart rate.

Chronic Effect— An adverse effect on a human or animal in which symptoms recur frequently or develop slowly over a long period of time.

Chronic Exposure— Multiple exposures occurring over an extended period of time or over a significant fraction of an animal’s or human’s lifetime (Usually seven years to a lifetime.)

Chronic Toxicity— The capacity of a substance to cause long-term poisonous health effects in humans, animals, fish, and other organisms.

Circle of Influence— The circular outer edge of a depression produced in the water table by the pumping of water from a well.

Cistern— Small tank or storage facility used to store water for a home or farm; often used to store rain water.

Clarification— Clearing action that occurs during wastewater treatment when solids settle out. This is often aided by centrifugal action and chemically induced coagulation in wastewater.

Clarifier— A tank in which solids settle to the bottom and are subsequently removed as sludge.

Class I Substance— One of several groups of chemicals with an ozone depletion potential of 0.2 or higher, including CFCS, Halons, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Methyl Chloroform (listed in the Clean Air Act), and HBFCs and Ethyl Bromide (added by EPA regulations).

Class II Substance— A substance with an ozone depletion potential of less than 0.2. All HCFCs are currently included in this classification.

Clay Soil— Soil material containing more than 40 percent clay, less than 45 percent sand, and less than 40 percent silt.

Clean Coal Technology— Any technology not in widespread use prior to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This Act will achieve significant reductions in pollutants associated with the burning of coal.

Clean Fuels— Blends or substitutes for gasoline fuels, including compressed natural gas, methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas.

Cleaner Technologies Substitutes Assessment— A document that systematically evaluates the relative risk, performance, and cost trade-offs of technological alternatives; serves as a repository for all the technical data (including methodology and results) developed by a DfE or other pollution prevention or education project.

Cleanup— Actions taken to deal with a release or threat of release of a hazardous substance that could affect humans and/or the environment. The term “cleanup” is sometimes used interchangeably with the terms remedial action, removal action, response action, or corrective action.

Clear Cut— Harvesting all the trees in one area at one time, a practice that can encourage fast rainfall or snowmelt runoff, erosion, sedimentation of streams and lakes, and flooding, and destroys vital habitat.

Clear Well— A reservoir for storing filtered water of sufficient quantity to prevent the need to vary the filtration rate with variations in demand. Also used to provide chlorine contact time for disinfection.

Climate Change (also referred to as ‘global climate change’)— The term ‘climate change’ is sometimes used to refer to all forms of climatic inconsistency, but because the Earth’s climate is never static, the term is more properly used to imply a significant change from one climatic condition to another. In some cases, ‘climate change’ has been used synonymously with the term, ‘global warming’; scientists however, tend to use the term in the wider sense to also include natural changes in climate.

Cloning— In biotechnology, obtaining a group of genetically identical cells from a single cell; making identical copies of a gene.

Closed-Loop Recycling— Reclaiming or reusing wastewater for non-potable purposes in an enclosed process.

Closure— The procedure a landfill operator must follow when a landfill reaches its legal capacity for solid ceasing acceptance of solid waste and placing a cap on the landfill site.

Co-fire— Burning of two fuels in the same combustion unit; e.g., coal and natural gas, or oil and coal.

Coagulation— Clumping of particles in wastewater to settle out impurities, often induced by chemicals such as lime, alum, and iron salts.

Coal Cleaning Technology— A precombustion process by which coal is physically or chemically treated to remove some of its sulfur so as to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions.

Coal Gasification— Conversion of coal to a gaseous product by one of several available technologies.

Coastal Zone— Lands and waters adjacent to the coast that exert an influence on the uses of the sea and its ecology, or whose uses and ecology are affected by the sea.

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)— Document that codifies all rules of the executive departments and agencies of the federal government. It is divided into fifty volumes, known as titles. Title 40 of the CFR (referenced as 40 CFR) lists all environmental regulations.

Coefficient of Haze (COH)— A measurement of visibility interference in the atmosphere.

Cogeneration— The consecutive generation of useful thermal and electric energy from the same fuel source.

Coke Oven— An industrial process which converts coal into coke, one of the basic materials used in blast furnaces for the conversion of iron ore into iron.

Cold Temperature CO— A standard for automobile emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions to be met at a low temperature (i.e. 20 degrees Fahrenheit). Conventional automobile catalytic converters are not efficient in cold weather until they warm up.

Coliform Index— A rating of the purity of water based on a count of fecal bacteria.

Coliform Organism— Microorganisms found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Their presence in water indicates fecal pollution and potentially adverse contamination by pathogens.

Collector— Public or private hauler that collects nonhazardous waste and recyclable materials from residential, commercial, institutional and industrial sources.

Collector Sewers— Pipes used to collect and carry wastewater from individual sources to an interceptor sewer that will carry it to a treatment facility.

Colloids— Very small, finely divided solids (that do not dissolve) that remain dispersed in a liquid for a long time due to their small size and electrical charge.

Combined Sewer Overflows— Discharge of a mixture of storm water and domestic waste when the flow capacity of a sewer system is exceeded during rainstorms.

Combined Sewers— A sewer system that carries both sewage and storm-water runoff. Normally, its entire flow goes to a waste treatment plant, but during a heavy storm, the volume of water may be so great as to cause overflows of untreated mixtures of storm water and sewage into receiving waters. Storm-water runoff may also carry toxic chemicals from industrial areas or streets into the sewer system.

Combustion— 1. Burning, or rapid oxidation, accompanied by release of energy in the form of heat and light. 2. Refers to controlled burning of waste, in which heat chemically alters organic compounds, converting into stable inorganics such as carbon dioxide and water.

Combustion Chamber— The actual compartment where waste is burned in an incinerator.

Combustion Product— Substance produced during the burning or oxidation of a material.

Command Post— Facility located at a safe distance upwind from an accident site, where the on-scene coordinator, responders, and technical representatives make response decisions, deploy manpower and equipment, maintain liaison with news media, and handle communications.

Command-and-Control Regulations— Specific requirements prescribing how to comply with specific standards defining acceptable levels of pollution.

Comment Period— Time provided for the public to review and comment on a proposed EPA action or rulemaking after publication in the Federal Register.

Commercial Waste— All solid waste emanating from business establishments such as stores, markets, office buildings, restaurants, shopping centers, and theaters.

Commercial Waste Management Facility— A treatment, storage, disposal, or transfer facility which accepts waste from a variety of sources, as compared to a private facility which normally manages a limited waste stream generated by its own operations.

Commingled Recyclables— Mixed recyclables that are collected together.

Comminuter— A machine that shreds or pulverizes solids to make waste treatment easier.

Comminution— Mechanical shredding or pulverizing of waste. Used in both solid waste management and wastewater treatment.

Common Sense Initiative— Voluntary program to simplify environmental regulation to achieve cleaner, cheaper, smarter results, starting with six major industry sectors.

Community— In ecology, an assemblage of populations of different species within a specified location in space and time. Sometimes, a particular subgrouping may be specified, such as the fish community in a lake or the soil arthropod community in a forest.

Community Relations— The EPA effort to establish two-way communication with the public to create understanding of EPA programs and related actions, to ensure public input into decision-making processes related to affected communities, and to make certain that the Agency is aware of and responsive to public concerns. Specific community relations activities are required in relation to Superfund remedial actions.

Community Water System— A public water system which serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents.

Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL)— Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps.

Compaction— Reduction of the bulk of solid waste by rolling and tamping.

Comparative Risk Assessment— Process that generally uses the judgement of experts to predict effects and set priorities among a wide range of environmental problems.

Complete Treatment— A method of treating water that consists of the addition of coagulant chemicals, flash mixing, coagulation-flocculation, sedimentation, and filtration. Also called conventional filtration.

Compliance Coal— Any coal that emits less than 1.2 pounds of sulfur dioxide per million Btu when burned. Also known as low sulfur coal.

Compliance Coating— A coating whose volatile organic compound content does not exceed that allowed by regulation.

Compliance Cycle— The 9-year calendar year cycle, beginning January 1, 1993, during which public water systems must monitor. Each cycle consists of three 3-year compliance periods.

Compliance Monitoring— Collection and evaluation of data, including self-monitoring reports, and verification to show whether pollutant concentrations and loads contained in permitted discharges are in compliance with the limits and conditions specified in the permit.

Compliance Schedule— A negotiated agreement between a pollution source and a government agency that specifies dates and procedures by which a source will reduce emissions and, thereby, comply with a regulation.

Composite Sample— A series of water samples taken over a given period of time and weighted by flow rate.

Compost— The relatively stable humus material that is produced from a composting process in which bacteria in soil mixed with garbage and degradable trash break down the mixture into organic fertilizer.

Composting— The controlled biological decomposition of organic material in the presence of air to form a humus-like material. Controlled methods of composting include mechanical mixing and aerating, ventilating the materials by dropping them through a vertical series of aerated chambers, or placing the compost in piles out in the open air and mixing it or turning it periodically.

Composting Facilities— 1. An offsite facility where the organic component of municipal solid waste is decomposed under controlled conditions; 2.an aerobic process in which organic materials are ground or shredded and then decomposed to humus in windrow piles or in mechanical digesters, drums, or similar enclosures.

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)— An alternative fuel for motor vehicles; considered one of the cleanest because of low hydrocarbon emissions and its vapors are relatively non-ozone producing. However, vehicles fueled with CNG do emit a significant quantity of nitrogen oxides.

Concentration— The relative amount of a substance mixed with another substance. An example is five ppm of carbon monoxide in air or 1 mg/l of iron in water.

Condensate— 1.Liquid formed when warm landfill gas cools as it travels through a collection system. 2. Water created by cooling steam or water vapor.

Condensate Return System— System that returns the heated water condensing within steam piping to the boiler and thus saves energy.

Conditional Registration— Under special circumstances, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) permits registration of pesticide products that is “conditional” upon the submission of additional data. These special circumstances include a finding by the EPA Administrator that a new product or use of an existing pesticide will not significantly increase the risk of unreasonable adverse effects. A product containing a new (previously unregistered) active ingredient may be conditionally registered only if the Administrator finds that such conditional registration is in the public interest, that a reasonable time for conducting the additional studies has not elapsed, and the use of the pesticide for the period of conditional registration will not present an unreasonable risk.

Conditionally Exempt Generators (CE)— Persons or enterprises which produce less than 220 pounds of hazardous waste per month. Exempt from most regulation, they are required merely to determine whether their waste is hazardous, notify appropriate state or local agencies, and ship it by an authorized transporter to a permitted facility for proper disposal.

Conductance— A rapid method of estimating the dissolved solids content of water supply by determining the capacity of a water sample to carry an electrical current. Conductivity is a measure of the ability of a solution to carry and electrical current.

Conductivity— A measure of the ability of a solution to carry an electrical current.

Cone of Depression— A depression in the water table that develops around a pumped well.

Cone of Influence— The depression, roughly conical in shape, produced in a water table by the pumping of water from a well.

Cone Penterometer Testing (CPT)— A direct push system used to measure lithology based on soil penetration resistance. Sensors in the tip of the cone of the DP rod measure tip resistance and side-wall friction, transmitting electrical signals to digital processing equipment on the ground surface.

Confidential Business Information (CBI)— Material that contains trade secrets or commercial or financial information that has been claimed as confidential by its source (e.g. a pesticide or new chemical formulation registrant). EPA has special procedures for handling such information.

Confidential Statement of Formula (CSF)— A list of the ingredients in a new pesticide or chemical formulation. The list is submitted at the time for application for registration or change in formulation.

Confined Aquifer— An aquifer in which ground water is confined under pressure which is significantly greater than atmospheric pressure.

Confluent Growth— A continuous bacterial growth covering all or part of the filtration area of a membrane filter in which the bacteria colonies are not discrete.

Consent Decree— A legal document, approved by a judge, that formalizes an agreement reached between EPA and potentially responsible parties (PRPs) through which PRPs will conduct all or part of a cleanup action at a Superfund site; cease or correct actions or processes that are polluting the environment; or otherwise comply with EPA initiated regulatory enforcement actions to resolve the contamination at the Superfund site involved. The consent decree describes the actions PRPs will take and may be subject to a public comment period.

Conservation— Preserving and renewing, when possible, human and natural resources. The use, protection, and improvement of natural resources according to principles that will ensure their highest economic or social benefits.

Conservation Easement— Easement restricting a landowner to land uses that that are compatible with long-term conservation and environmental values.

Constituent(s) of Concern— Specific chemicals that are identified for evaluation in the site assessment process

Construction and Demolition Waste— Waste building materials, dredging materials, tree stumps, and rubble resulting from construction, remodeling, repair, and demolition of homes, commercial buildings and other structures and pavements. May contain lead, asbestos, or other hazardous substances.

Construction Ban— If, under the Clean Air Act, EPA disapproves an area’s planning requirements for correcting nonattainment, EPA can ban the construction or modification of any major stationary source of the pollutant for which the area is in nonattainment.

Consumptive Water Use— Water removed from available supplies without return to a water resources system, e.g. water used in manufacturing, agriculture, and food preparation.

Contact Pesticide— A chemical that kills pests when it touches them, instead of by ingestion. Also, soil that contains the minute skeletons of certain algae that scratch and dehydrate waxy-coated insects.

Contaminant— Any physical, chemical, biological, or radiological substance or matter that has an adverse effect on air, water, or soil.

Contamination— Introduction into water, air, and soil of microorganisms, chemicals, toxic substances, wastes, or wastewater in a concentration that makes the medium unfit for its next intended use. Also applies to surfaces of objects, buildings, and various household and agricultural use products.

Contamination Source Inventory— An inventory of contaminant sources within delineated State Water-Protection Areas. Targets likely sources for further investigation.

Contingency Plan— A document setting out an organized, planned, and coordinated course of action to be followed in case of a fire, explosion, or other accident that releases toxic chemicals, hazardous waste, or radioactive materials that threaten human health or the environment.

Continuous Discharge— A routine release to the environment that occurs without interruption, except for infrequent shutdowns for maintenance, process changes, etc.

Continuous Sample— A flow of water, waste or other material from a particular place in a plant to the location where samples are collected for testing. May be used to obtain grab or composite samples.

Contour Plowing— Soil tilling method that follows the shape of the land to discourage erosion.

Contour Strip Farming— A kind of contour farming in which row crops are planted in strips, between alternating strips of close-growing, erosion-resistant forage crops.

Contract Labs— Laboratories under contract to EPA, which analyze samples taken from waste, soil, air, and water or carry out research projects.

Control Technique Guidelines (CTG)— EPA documents designed to assist state and local pollution authorities to achieve and maintain air quality standards for certain sources (e.g. organic emissions from solvent metal cleaning known as degreasing) through reasonably available control technologies (RACT).

Controlled Reaction— A chemical reaction under temperature and pressure conditions maintained within safe limits to produce a desired product or process.

Conventional Pollutants— Statutorily listed pollutants understood well by scientists. These may be in the form of organic waste, sediment, acid, bacteria, viruses, nutrients, oil and grease, or heat.

Conventional Site Assessment— Assessment in which most of the sample analysis and interpretation of data is completed off-site; process usually requires repeated mobilization of equipment and staff in order to fully determine the extent of contamination.

Conventional Systems— Systems that have been traditionally used to collect municipal wastewater in gravity sewers and convey it to a central primary or secondary treatment plant prior to discharge to surface waters.

Conventional Tilling— Tillage operations considered standard for a specific location and crop and that tend to bury the crop residues; usually considered as a base for determining the cost effectiveness of control practices.

Conveyance Loss— Water loss in pipes, channels, conduits, ditches by leakage or evaporation.

Cooling Electricity Use— Amount of electricity used to meet the building cooling load.

Cooling Tower— A structure that helps remove heat from water used as a coolant; e.g., in electric power generating plants.

Cooling Tower— Device which dissipates the heat from water-cooled systems by spraying the water through streams of rapidly moving air.

Cooperative Agreement— An assistance agreement whereby EPA transfers money, property, services or anything of value to a state, university, non-profit, or not-for-profit organization for the accomplishment of authorized activities or tasks.

Core— The uranium-containing heart of a nuclear reactor, where energy is released.

Core Program Cooperative Agreement— An assistance agreement whereby EPA supports states or tribal governments with funds to help defray the cost of non-item-specific administrative and training activities.

Corrective Action— EPA can require treatment, storage and disposal (TSDF) facilities handling hazardous waste to undertake corrective actions to clean up spills resulting from failure to follow hazardous waste management procedures or other mistakes. The process includes cleanup procedures designed to guide TSDFs toward in spills.

Corrosion— The dissolution and wearing away of metal caused by a chemical reaction such as between water and the pipes, chemicals touching a metal surface, or contact between two metals.

Corrosive— A chemical agent that reacts with the surface of a material causing it to deteriorate or wear away.

Cost/Benefit Analysis— A quantitative evaluation of the costs which would have incurred by implementing an environmental regulation versus the overall benefits to society of the proposed action.

Cost Recovery— A legal process by which potentially responsible parties who contributed to contamination at a Superfund site can be required to reimburse the Trust Fund for money spent during any cleanup actions by the federal government.

Cost Sharing— A publicly financed program through which society, as a beneficiary of environmental protection, shares part of the cost of pollution control with those who must actually install the controls. In Superfund, for example, the government may pay part of the cost of a cleanup action with those responsible for the pollution paying the major share.

Cost-Effective Alternative— An alternative control or corrective method identified after analysis as being the best available in terms of reliability, performance, and cost. Although costs are one important consideration, regulatory and compliance analysis does not require EPA to choose the least expensive alternative. For example, when selecting or approving a method for cleaning up a Superfund site, the Agency balances costs with the long-term effectiveness of the methods proposed and the potential danger posed by the site.

Cover Crop— A crop that provides temporary protection for delicate seedlings and/or provides a cover canopy for seasonal soil protection and improvement between normal crop production periods.

Cover Material— Soil used to cover compacted solid waste in a sanitary landfill.

Cradle-to-Grave or Manifest System— A procedure in which hazardous materials are identified and followed as they are produced, treated, transported, and disposed of by a series of permanent, linkable, descriptive documents (e.g. manifests). Commonly referred to as the cradle-to-grave system.

Criteria— Descriptive factors taken into account by EPA in setting standards for various pollutants. These factors are used to determine limits on allowable concentration levels, and to limit the number of violations per year. When issued by EPA, the criteria provide guidance to the states on how to establish their standards.

Criteria Pollutants— The 1970 amendments to the Clean Air Act required EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards for certain pollutants known to be hazardous to human health. EPA has identified and set standards to protect human health and welfare for six pollutants— ozone, carbon monoxide, total suspended particulates, sulfur dioxide, lead, and nitrogen oxide. The term, “criteria pollutants” derives from the requirement that EPA must describe the characteristics and potential health and welfare effects of these pollutants. It is on the basis of these criteria that standards are set or revised.

Critical Effect— The first adverse effect, or its known precursor, that occurs as a dose rate increases. Designation is based on evaluation of overall database.

Crop Consumptive Use— The amount of water transpired during plant growth plus what evaporated from the soil surface and foliage in the crop area.

Crop Rotation— Planting a succession of different crops on the same land rea as opposed to planting the same crop time after time.

Cross Contamination— The movement of underground contaminants from one level or area to another due to invasive subsurface activities.

Cross-Connection— Any actual or potential connection between a drinking water system and an unapproved water supply or other source of contamination.

Crumb Rubber— Ground rubber fragments the size of sand or silt used in rubber or plastic products, or processed further into reclaimed rubber or asphalt products.

Cryptosporidium— A protozoan microbe associated with the disease cryptosporidiosis in man. The disease can be transmitted through ingestion of drinking water, person-to-person contact, or other pathways, and can cause acute diarrhea, abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, and can be fatal as it was in the Milwaukee episode.

Cubic Feet Per Minute (CFM)— A measure of the volume of a substance flowing through air within a fixed period of time. With regard to indoor air, refers to the amount of air, in cubic feet, that is exchanged with outdoor air in a minute’s time; i.e. the air exchange rate.

Cullet— Crushed glass.

Cultural Eutrophication— Increasing rate at which water bodies “die” by pollution from human activities.

Cultures and Stocks— Infectious agents and associated biologicals including cultures from medical and pathological laboratories; cultures and stocks of infectious agents from research and industrial laboratories; waste from the production of biologicals; discarded live and attenuated vaccines; and culture dishes and devices used to transfer, inoculate, and mix cultures.

Cumulative Ecological Risk Assessment— Consideration of the total ecological risk from multiple stressors to a given eco-zone.

Cumulative Exposure— The sum of exposures of an organism to a pollutant over a period of time.

Cumulative Working Level Months (CWLM)— The sum of lifetime exposure to radon working levels expressed in total working level months.

Curb Stop— A water service shutoff valve located in a water service pipe near the curb and between the water main and the building.

Curbside Collection— Method of collecting recyclable materials at homes, community districts or businesses.

Cutie-Pie— An instrument used to measure radiation levels.

Cuttings— Spoils left by conventional drilling with hollow stem auger or rotary drilling equipment.

Cyclone Collector— A device that uses centrifugal force to remove large particles from polluted air.